If one cannot enjoy reading a book over and over again, there is no use in reading it at all. - Oscar Wilde
We shouldn't teach great books; we should teach a love of reading. - B. F. Skinner
No entertainment is so cheap as reading, nor any pleasure so lasting. - Mary Wortley Montagu

Saturday, April 16, 2016

Review: The Elusive Highlander by Ju Ephraime / @Bookenthupromo @JuEphraime



Title: The Elusive Highlander
Author: Ju Ephraime
Publisher: ENVISION Business & Computer School Publishing
Release Date: April 15, 2016
Genre: Time Travel (Modern to Historical), Romance
ARC Received From & Reviewed For: Book Enthusiast Promotions


WARRIOR TOO ELUSIVE TO CAPTURE

He is a Scottish Laird who lives in a world of Druid magic and ancient customs, hand fasted to the sister of his rival clan, MacDougall. Alasdair thought he was doing the right thing trying to bring peace to the region. But he is murdered on the eve of his wedding. Not willing to accept his death, his mother, a Druid priestess, performs a geas to keep him alive. But something went awry because, as the last word of the geas was spoken, Alasdair is trapped in time where he wanders the earth for centuries. The only one who can bring him back home is his betrothed. He has given up on ever finding her until she walks into his office in twentieth century Manhattan.

A WOMAN TOO STRONG WILLED TO TAME

Coira Ainsley is a happy-go-lucky young woman living in twenty-first century Manhattan. Her job as a travel agent takes her all over. She loves the work she does and is excellent at it. That is until she follows her client into his office and finds herself in the fourteenth century at Inveraray Keep in the Highlands of Scotland. At first, Coira thinks a prank is being played on her until she sees the giant, wearing nothing but a kilt and a studded leather strap across his massive chest approach her. Not one given to swooning, Coira finds herself welcoming the darkness that come over her as she loses consciousness, without learning that the naked giant is her betrothed from another time… another place. Will she give in and accept what has been pre-destined or will she fight to get back to the life she knows and loves.


I've read some time travel romances that left me breathless, some that made me cringe, and others that fell somewhere in between. This one was somewhere in between.

Alasdair and Coira's relationship in the present is strictly business. The attraction they feel for one another is slightly more than deep interest though neither can explain why. Their relationship in the past is a little more...tempestuous? Because Coira fell through time and landed in Alasdair's home, it's hard for her to fully grasp what's happening as well accept that this is her new life. Her desire for Alasdair is confusing at first for her; she doesn't want to want him. She wants to get back to Manhattan, to the life she made for herself, and to her dad who needs her. While she doesn't fall back into present times, she does communicate with her father.

I liked most of this story. There is a great deal of history packed into this book and, for me, it read like a history book--factual, straightforward, detached. It was difficult for me to stay interested in the story when the history lesson ended because each section that was dialect and/or narrative wasn't long enough.

Ms. Ephraime does have a lovely voice though. She tells her story clearly, bringing the past and the present together through conversations and emotions. While the amount of history in this story might deter some readers, I hope it doesn't do that to others.


She is an eternal optimist and an insatiable reader/writer, especially of high heat romance. She writes in several genres; however, her favorite is contemporary romance. She loves reading historical romances, but doesn't know if she'd write one. (Take that back, she's since written one). She earned her last degree from NEU in Boston. She loves writing children’s books, for fun and relaxation. She finds it's easy to slip back into her childhood, where she takes the time to play.

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